Why are certain parts of an animal valued more than others? They cannot be disassociated from the animal in its entirety
Impala Trophy 2018 Clay, acrylic, spray paint, wood, joint compound, handmade paper ~10''w x 10''d x 18'' h
A variation of my trophy series representing the gesture of the giraffe and its relationship with the acacia tree, its main source of food. Their relationship is symbiotic and integral to the ecosystem. Giraffes are hunted by big-game hunters due to their
Impala Trophy: Detail 2018 Clay, wood, joint compound, handmade paper, wire, tar paper, spray paint, acrylic 20’’w x 34’’h x 18’’d
Impala Trophy: Detail 2018 Clay, acrylic, spray paint, wood, hand made paper, joint compound ~10''w x 10'' d x 18'' h
hen an animal is hunted for a specific element of its body, that element cannot be disassociated from the creature as a whole. The skin of the leopard is inherent to its body and essence. By keeping the two visually together, the viewer is reminded of the
Skinned and Stretched 2019 Concrete, acrylic, spray paint, fabric ~5’w x 4’d x 3’h
The silhouette of an elephant is an iconic element of the Serengeti ecosystem. As the elephant population plummets due to poaching, the world is approaching a day in which this silhouette will no longer be remembered, and fossils will serve as the world’s
As Above, So Below: Elephant 2019 Paper, wood, acrylic, spray paint, sand 24’’w x 24’’h x ½ ’’d
An element of my thesis- in progress
Elephant Tapestry 2020 Pastel, plaster gauze, tissue paper, screen, acrylic, spray paint 4' x 4'
A variation of my trophy series representing the gesture of the giraffe and its relationship with the acacia tree, its main source of food. Their relationship is symbiotic and integral to the ecosystem. Giraffes are hunted by big-game hunters due to their
Giraffe Trophy 2019 Clay, wood, joint compound, handmade paper, wire, tar paper, spray paint, acrylic 20’’w x 34’’h x 18’’d
A variation of my trophy series representing the gesture of the giraffe and its relationship with the acacia tree, its main source of food. Their relationship is symbiotic and integral to the ecosystem. Giraffes are hunted by big-game hunters due to their
Giraffe Trophy: Detail 2019 Clay, wood, joint compound, handmade paper, wire, tar paper, spray paint, acrylic 20’’w x 34’’h x 18’’d
ext taken from “Five Years of a Hunter’s Life in the Far Interior of Africa” by Roualeyn Gordon-Cumming, one of the first big game hunters to chronicle his practices. These tusks become grotesque decor through poaching and hunting, The hunting and bullets
Five Years: A Collection 2019 Plaster, wire, joint compound, acrylic modeling paste, bullets, spray paint, acrylic, charcoal ~2.5’w x 2.5’ d x 1’h
Text taken from “Five Years of a Hunter’s Life in the Far Interior of Africa” by Roualeyn Gordon-Cumming, one of the first big game hunters to chronicle his practices. These tusks become grotesque decor through poaching and hunting, The hunting and bullet
Five Years: A Collection (Detail) 2019 Plaster, wire, joint compound, acrylic modeling paste, bullets, spray paint, acrylic, charcoal ~2.5’w x 2.5’ d x 1’h
When humans see an ostrich, what do we value most? The animal as a whole, or simply the parts?
Ostrich Trophy 2019 Clay, paper, vegan fondant, acrylic, spray paint, wood, paper, joint compound ~10'' w x 10'' d x 18'' h
Observation of elephant relationships
Mother and Child 2018 Pastel 24"x36"
Statement

It is inherent in human nature that one feels the need to create hierarchy, placing humankind above all else. We create barriers, isolating ourselves as more sentient and conscious than any other living thing. Water, plants, and wildlife are often viewed as commodities, free for the taking. This is a one-sided, unhealthy relationship. In order to successfully coexist with, not in, the environment, one must consciously enter a symbiotic relationship with the natural world. When one begins listening and watching the way elements of the environment interact with each other, humankind begins to learn about not only the amazing patterns of behavior in the world, but also more about their own nature.

I consciously repurpose what I take from the environment in my art in order to advocate for the natural world. In doing so, I present wildlife as conscious, sentient, and individual. I challenge the motivations and actions surrounding poaching, hunting, and the utilization of animals as décor. I highlight the inability to disassociate the animal from the parts that humans deem important. They are one in the same, thus emphasizing the dignity and holistic value of the animal.

I explore material and surface manipulation to create a conversation about the interaction between the animal realm and humankind. Through the agency of manipulating or constructing my own mediums, I tell a story surrounding issues of wildlife conservation and animal rights. I pay homage and show respect to the wild nature and inherent beauty of each individual creature. My mixed media experimentation, scale, and diversity of textures combine to present the viewer with an interactive work that calls for physical engagement. Through this engagement, the viewer leaves with a fuller understanding of the natural world and the desire to continue the conversation.

I am deeply influenced from my travels through Tanzania. Through the experience of camping and living alongside the animals within their own space, I understood how they interacted with and affected their environment. It is because of these travel experiences that I became passionate about the conservation of various endangered species and the sustainable integration of humankind within the natural world.

I similarly draw influence from the work of observational biologists and environmental rights activists who study and understand the personalities and value of different species. Through extensive research in the fields of science, politics, and psychology, I develop a well-rounded understanding of the animals I represent and the multi-layered issues surrounding poaching and environmental conservation.

Rinehart School of Sculpture (MFA) Students